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CONSULTANCY ON END OF PROJECT EVALUATION FOR THE ANGAZA PROJECT

  1. ABOUT THE ANGAZA PROJECT

The Angaza Project runs for 2 years from September 2017 to September 2019 and aims at strengthening civil society for improved engagement in climate change governance in Kenya. The Angaza project has a national focus but also targets policy influence at county level through CSO networks and collaboration with county governments. Additionally the project targets to engage private sector on green growth development and Climate policy implementation.  For the past one and half years, Private sector engagement has resulted into partnership with Kenya Industrial Estate (KIE) in creating awareness and building capacity of Small medium Enterprises (SMEs)   on Climate governance. As a result, SMEs in Kenya can take advantage of the emerging opportunities in green growth and policy implementation. Apart from Private sector engagement, the project also seeks to enhance the skills and capacity of journalist to report and simplify information on climate governance in Kenya.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATION FOR CONSULTANTS

This assignment is open to both qualified individuals and duly registered qualified organizations. Specific qualifications entail;

  1. Demonstrate deep knowledge about climate change and regional integration in Africa.
  2. Have expertise in Climate change, communication/advocacy and formulation, monitoring and evaluation of development programs.
  3. Demonstrate skills and experience in conducting evaluations using the outcome harvesting approach.
  4. Experience working at the regional level with CSO´s in Africa and or other developing countries will be an added advantage.
  5. Knowledge about the socio-political and cultural context in Africa.
  6. Fluency in English and must have experience and capacity to work in an international setup.

DURATION OF THE ASSIGNMENT

  The entire evaluation is expected to take place from 1st of July 2019 and finalized by 30th of August 2019. Timelines for the specific deliverables will be agreed on with the successful consultant before commencement of the assignment. 

For More information see attached document below

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Environment tribunal gives Kenyans hope in coal project ruling

There was celebration at the Supreme Court in Nairobi when a National Land Tribunal cancelled a firm’s licence and ordered a new Environment Impact Assessment before a coal-fired power project could be considered.

Like most coal power plants, the Lamu coal-fired power project, if let to continue, would have generated Green House gases beyond what is comfortable for humans and the rest of the biodiversity around the plant, according to experts.

The Kenyan court ruling that saw the cancelling of a licence belonging to AMU Power, a consortium that won the tender to put up the plant, gave a reprieve to many. At the same time, the court asked the National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) to do adequate community engagement, as what was done did not fit the magnitude of the project envisioned.

The Pan-African Climate Justice Alliance (PACJA) has been pushing for the climate justice, and seeing such a move taken by the courts over what has displayed vested interests than genuine need to provide power for Kenyans, was something worth commending the Judiciary for, according to Mithika Mwenda, a climate justice champion.

Mithika, the PACJA Executive Director, gave a speech on the ruling. “Kenya must not turn her back on set green goals. We are a party to the Paris Agreement of 2015. We promised to sustain our renewable sources of energy and reduce our small carbon footprint by 30 per cent by 2030. Let us do the right thing,” Mithika said in a statement read on his behalf outside the court soon after the ruling.

“Continuing with the construction of a coal-powered plant in Lamu would increase greenhouse gas emissions by up to 700 per cent. Why would anyone continue to support such a project, unless they are out to slowly but surely wipe out generations or gain materially,” he posed.

Other people shared Mithika’s sentiments. “This was a great victory in so many levels, in terms of upholding certain values of sustainable development under the Constitution, amplifying and recognising the voices and concerns of people of Lamu, so that this is no longer just seen as a crusade against development, but need to open a public debate about weighing the costs and benefits of development projects and making sure that where there are concerns sufficient protections are put in place so that development is inclusive,” said Mark Odanga, a lawyer from a non-governmental organisation present at the court.

The five-judge bench faulted the AMU Power and NEMA for failing to conduct a proper people participation exercise and ordered a repeat of the same.

“The second respondent (AMU power) is hereby ordered to cease the construction of the coal plant in Lamu until a fresh Environment Assessment Impact and public participation is undertaken, and the outcome of the report be published publicly,” read the ruling presented by Justice Mohammed Balala on behalf of the rest of the bench.

“The second respondent (NEMA) acted in violation in issuing the first respondent (AMU power) with an operating license without having adequately involved Lamu residents in public participation as required by the law,” Balala added. 

A lot of nations are moving towards green air. The Green House Gas emission is not welcome in a country that is a signatory to the 2015 Paris Agreement, according to the Civil Society Organisations that have been opposed to the Lamu power project.

“These are forces that want the poor fisher-folk to go without food; forces that care less about Lamu’s 700 year history and the fact that this is a UNESCO site...” PACJA’s Mithika has said of the firms involved in the intended construction of the plant.

In an earlier statement, he wondered why China was getting involved in the Lamu coal project. “Why is China funding this and other coal-powered projects around the world when, as a nation, it is shifting towards clean and renewable energy back home? We all know that this is because the Chinese want market for their coal. The Chines are therefore not funding us; we are being robbed in broad daylight.”

Mithika also had a word for NEMA: “The National Environmental Management Authority disappointed many. You (NEMA) could have done better than this as expected champions of safe environment. How could you have failed to notice the air quality impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed coal power plant locally?”

Besides the aforementioned, PACJA has been opposed to the project because of the noise during the operation phase, especially for the permanent workers who would live in a camp on or near the site.

Others are the terrestrial and marine ecological impact that is likely to be insurmountable at this shoreline.

“And it is not lost on us that the project will discharge heated waste water or effluent into the sea, which could potentially affect the Manda Bay’s marine biodiversity, including mangroves, coral reefs and sea grass beds,” Mithika said in his statement.

Others are the elevated temperature at the discharge outlet that could affect the marine ecology in the vicinity of the discharge outlet, as international best practice and national legislation allow a maximum variation of 3°C.

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Statement in response to court ruling on the Lamu Coal Project, Nairobi, Kenya

This is a Win for Kenya, and Justice for the Poor Lamu People?

 

We stand here to celebrate the ruling of the National Environment Tribunal on the coal-powered project in Lamu.

This is in deed a win, though not only for the Lamu people but for the taxpayers, who were bound to lose and owe billions of shillings for a project that was only going to increase cost of power.

This country has for years fallen prey to the greedy East, which is itself moving towards cleaner and renewable energy, yet still funding a coal power project in Kenya’s Lamu, in disregard of the biodiversity around it and the fact that we will remain with a stranded asset. Why should China preach wine, and take water?

Today, as we walked to the Supreme Court for the National Environment Tribunal’s ruling on the coal-powered project in Lamu, we were hopeful that the ruling would favour the Lamu people, and Kenyans.

We thank the Tribunal for listening to the voice of reason. May the Government and investors do the same for that is the only way we shall save the ecosystem.

Funding for this project can be redirected to the unexploited solar energy, which would be safer and cheaper. What if we empowered the locals and maximised on security, agriculture and tourism at the coast? We would still have enough to export and earn foreign exchange than rely on coal powered project that would leave many displaced, sick and others dead besides having to do with a stranded asset.

The tribunal has taken the narrow path followed by a few. But it is not in vain. It is not the numbers that will save the environment and the people in Lamu, but the right decisions and actions.

We call upon our Parliament, National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), the private sector, the Executive and even the Judiciary, to stay on course and ensure this project does not continue. Wanjiku must live. The poor folk down at the Coast have suffered enough already. Let us help them grow the economy, rather than displace them and destroy their livelihoods.

Besides, it is not always that a country harbours assets like the Lamu’s 700-year history and the fact that this is a UNESCO site.

With this ruling, the taxpayer is on course to being saved from owing billions of shillings on a project that would have been more of a liability than asset.

It is not by accident or out of ignorance that China is funding this and other coal-powered projects around the world when, as a nation, it is shifting towards clean and renewable energy back home. The Chinese just want market for their coal and expertise. Continuing with the Lamu project would, therefore be allowing them to rob us in broad daylight.

Kenya must not turn her back on set green goals. We are a party to the Paris Agreement of 2015. We promised to sustain our renewable sources of energy and reduce our small carbon footprint by 30 per cent by 2030. Let us do the right thing.

Continuing with the construction of a coal-powered plant in Lamu would increase greenhouse gas emissions by up to 700 per cent. Why would anyone continue to support such a project, unless they are out to slowly but surely wipe out generations or gain materially?

NEMA should stay true to its mandate and prioritise biodiversity, not allowing implementation of projects that kill biodiversity for the short time they exist. Coal is not cool, and as champions of safe environment, NEMA could have done better in the environmental impact assessment of the Lamu coal powered project.

How could NEMA have failed to foresee the possible air quality impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed coal power plant locally?

What about the noise during the operation phase, especially for the permanent workers who would live in a camp on or near the site? The terrestrial and marine ecological impacts would be insurmountable at the shoreline. It is not lost on Kenyans that the project would discharge heated wastewater or effluent into the sea, potentially affecting the Manda Bay’s marine biodiversity, including mangroves, coral reefs and sea grass beds. The elevated temperature at the discharge outlet would obviously affect the marine ecology in the vicinity of the discharge outlet. Yet international best practice and national legislation allow a maximum variation of 3°C.

We urge President Uhuru Kenyatta to order the cancelation of this project on grounds that it is hazardous and a rip-off. May he listen to the voice of reason from genuine experts. This will contribute to his legacy. He will be remembered not only as the President who saved humanity and left this country healthy and peaceful, but also as one who saved us from opportunists out to feast on poor Kenyans, even when corruption and inflation won’t let them breath.

We appeal to the Government to focus on the unexploited solar energy, and appeal to the public to reject any future plans to implement destructive projects, all for the sake of our children and their children’s children.

As civil society, we shall continue to stand with the Lamu people and Kenyans and fight for clean and renewable energy.

The fight continues.

 

Mithika Mwenda

 

Executive Director

Pan African Climate Justice Alliance

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House No.J13, Kabarnet road, Ngong Road, Nairobi, Kenya
+254 0208075808
Email:info@pacja.org, appeals@pacja.org

For feedback or grievances contact
+254  202003621          
complaints@pacja.org, appeals@pacja.org